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(Photo: Lucia_omnomnom)

It has been a hot, maybe too hot, of a start to the year for the popular broadcast platform, Twitch. The Amazon-owned company has been in the spotlight for several recent streaming incidents including the return of an abuser, a topless streamer, a live blowjob, and booty joint rolling. The more mainstream the platform seems to go, the more it seems people are unaware of the rules, unsure altogether as to what streaming on the platform is supposed to entail, or don’t realize a camera means people can see you.

The platform, which was founded originally under the name of Justin.tv as a way for gamers to share their content, has transformed over the years in ways some deem negative while others want to understand the flow of business trends and the need to keep up to stay relevant. Categories like Creative, In Real Life (IRL), and more have sprung up on the site before transforming into even further detailed categories. Gaming is no longer a requirement at all and streamers can simply set themselves to “Just Chatting” or other categories and enjoy the platform as they see fit so long as they don’t break any rules.

Twitch has a set of Community Guidelines that users must follow in order to continue their use of the product. Streamers ranging from popular to brand new have faced the repercussions of making homophobic remarks, sexual content, and more.

Recently, however, community members have been wondering just how all of this is decided. A Romanian Twitch streamer Lucia “Lucia_omnomnom”  Dita mistakenly went topless live on stream and received a 3-day ban to kick off the year. Dita had hosted & raided another streamer, and having only been on the platform for a few months assumed this ended her stream (it does not – I repeat, it does not). The 3-day ban drew a lot of debate with some stating it’s fair as it was a mistake while others compared it to much worse bans for what they felt were lighter crimes.

Shortly after, another streamer by the name of etole11 decided to receive fellatio on his broadcast. While the blowjob was never shown on camera, the video (Which can be found through our original article: here) breaks Twitch’s policy against sexual content / sexually suggestive content.

Both of these incidents followed an earlier incident which involved law enforcement. A streamer by the name of MrDeadMoth was streaming Fortnite on Twitch when an altercation between he and his wife turned physical. The streamer was banned from Twitch only to return to the platform in January following a court appearance. This drew a flood of backlash to the gates of Twitch. After a short period of silence, Twitch banned the account once again.

Next up was an official Twitch channel. A partnership between Twitch’s Food channel and PRØHBTD, a cannabis enthusiast organization saw footage aired that may not have met the “family-friendly” content tag it was marked with. During the broadcast, a woman is seen rolling a joint on the butt of another woman. With the current political climate around cannabis, many in the community were less upset at the drugs or even the joint being rolled on a girls bottom, but the family-friendly tag that Twitch had given its own channel when airing such a video.

What has streamers and Twitch viewers up in arms the most is the perceived inconsistent penalties which are handed out to streamers who violate the rules. Twitch has remained mostly silent about the recent incidents but should this become the norm, the roar of the crowd and clashing of pitchforks will only get louder.

Related article:

Streamer Goes Topless While Live, Gets 3 Day Ban

 

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